ADULT HEALTH II CLINICAL ROTATION // LETIFFANYSHOW

hellothere

Welcome back to my blog!

Adult health II clinicals is finally over and I could not be any more excited. I’m just tired lol and it felt super long. It was four weeks of endless paperwork and 12-hour shifts. I struggled taking care of myself during this rotation because I was drowning in paperwork and trying to get enough sleep. Bad tiffany! One thing I like to remind people (which I need to remind myself) is, take care of yourself because you can’t take care of others if you’re unwell.

Today I thought I’d talk about my overall experience in this clinical rotation. I was super nervous going into this rotation because I’ve heard that we were expected to do way more things. I suddenly felt so blank about my nursing skills and abilities.

In this rotation, we had a lot more expectations because our professor was more strict. She ran clinicals her way and sometimes her expectations didn’t match up with our past experiences. We were expected to do much more real nursing stuff but unfortunately due to past clinical experiences, we weren’t as equipped as she expected us to be. Therefore, her rules and regulations were very intimidating to me but as days went by, I got used to it and got through the days just fine. She emphasized time management and the importance of assessing your patients. It may have seemed repetitive at the time but a big chunk of this profession IS time management and assessing your patients. Getting your morning assessment done in time is important because it gives you a baseline and clinical picture of your patient. So if anything happens throughout the day, you would know its not normal. Makes sense, right? We also charted on our patients and it was a lot of clicking. One of the hardest parts was finding time to sit down to chart on our patients and I found that difficult for a lot of nurses as well.

At the beginning, we were assigned 1 patient each. This patient was our responsibility and we were expected to know everything about this patient. Therefore, we picked a patient the night before and did a bunch of paperwork regarding this patient. It required us to learn how to dig through their chart to find out the history and physical, the reason why they’re at the hospital, any relevant labs or diagnostics, and medications they’re taking. The paperwork was lengthy, especially after a 12 hour shift, but I found it really helpful because I liked being able to know what my patient’s situation was before I walked into their hospital room. So I spent a lot of time prepping to make sure I didn’t miss anything significant.

Even though in real nursing life I wouldn’t be able to do that, from all this paperwork experience, I learned how to efficiently find the relevant information I needed to properly take care of my patient. I would rather not do paperwork but hey, I learned new things. The section that took the most time was the medication list. Some patients have 3 medications, some patients have 20. Just imagine researching 20 medications for their recommended dosages, side effects, and nursing interventions. There were some medications that were repeated between patients so I kind of wish I created a database where I could just copy and paste the information but I think I learned it better by manually researching it every single time.

Eventually by week 3, I was upgraded to 2 patients and it was nerve wracking. The paperwork got heavier but by time I got 2 patients, I had learned how to efficiently find the important information the night before. As long as I had the important information, I could fill in the blanks later when I had some “downtime”. The information I needed was the information that told me what I would be looking for during my initial assessment. I did mostly focused assessments meaning I would just focus on the body system that’s affected by the reason why they’re at the hospital. For example, if they’re in for pancreatitis, I would focus on the heart, lungs, abdomen and their comfort levels.

Before this rotation, I set three goals to make the best out of my clinical experience. Here are these goals and whether I succeeded or not:

  1. Improve my communication skills.

I suck at talking to people. I envy those who can make conversation with anything and everything. Like how do you do it? Teach me yo ways!!  I’m just shy and with ill patients, I’m afraid to speak because I’m scared I’ll say something that will offend them. So I just stand there and smile and let them talk. But this rotation, I improved with talking to the patients. Practice makes almost perfect! I tend to practice while driving. It probably looks crazy but I guess it worked because during my mid-evals, my professor told me I did just fine talking to the patients and nurses! YAY!

2. Be more assertive.

I’m not sure if I accomplished this one. But I asked way more questions and was able to ask for help when I needed it. I don’t know, I was pretty excited when I knew the answers whenever my nurse asked me something. That means I’m learning something!!

3. Take opportunities.

I definitely accomplished this one. I was presented with the opportunity to go to the ICU and ED and I initially did not want to go but I decided to take the opportunity and there were no regrets at all! It opened my eyes to other departments and challenged me to think about how I could be better.

And that was pretty much what my clinical rotation was like! I had a really good time these four weeks and compared to my first day, my confidence has boosted. I need to remind myself that I am capable and I can do this. It just takes time.

Say it with me. You are capable and you can do it! It doesn’t matter how long it takes as long as you don’t give up. 🙂

Thank you so much for stopping by and reading this blog post! If you liked this post, please like and follow my blog!

Signing off from this blog post… I hope you have a beautiful day and don’t forget to shine bright, you’re beautiful. Thanks for reading!

 

Peace out.✌

❤ , TIFF

Real Nurse (R.N.) in the making.

 

psst… check out my last post here!

psst… I just started maternal newborn and ugh save me. lol I forgot how to study.

 


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TRAUMATIZED BY SIM LAB (lol) // LETIFFANYSHOW

Hello friends 3

SIM lab is a place where all dreams go to die. Kidding. But I may or may not be traumatized by my SIM lab experience.

Welcome back to my blog! I participated in a SIM lab and I thought I’d write about my experiences and reflect on what I would have done different. Grab a snack because this is going to be a long one…

Background

Simulation lab (SIM lab for short) is an activity we have in nursing school where we’re put in a room that mimics a hospital room with a SIM mannequin that mimics a human. It’s pretty cool cause the mannequin has respirations, has a pulse, and it talks! Well, the professor and the IT master control the mannequin in the control room but it’s amazing how much technology we have these days. So basically, the professor gives us a scenario, picks 2 student nurses to go in the room to do the simulation while the rest of the group sits in a different room and watch them do their thang on a big screen tv. I’ve done this before but this time, it was bad…

For some reason, I had a feeling my professor was going to pick me so I studied up on the topic. We knew it was going to be on Pulmonary Embolism (PE) so I focused on PE the night before when I was studying for my exam and reviewed before the lab. That way, if she picked me, I wouldn’t be completely clueless on the nursing interventions and what to do when your patient is having a difficult time.When she picked me, I was super nervous but I was like, ok I got this, lets do this. I have nothing to lose but some dignity (LOL)…

And… I don’t got it.

You see, the thing about these simulation labs is that you think you know what you’re going to do but the moment you go into the room, its like you forget everything nursing. Not only you have pressure of saving the SIM patient but also in the back of your mind, you have at least 8 pairs of eyes watching you. It’s a lot of pressure! So the moment my patient said, I CAN’T BREATHE and I’M IN PAIN, my mind completely blanked. And as we assessed the patient even further, his HR kept going up and his oxygen saturation kept going down. He was crashing and I blanked even more. The worst part was, the SIM patient said he was in pain and I administered morphine without checking the computer for orders or calling the provider. *facepalm* In the moment, I was thinking, “okay he’s in pain, pain is a priority, I should relieve his pain.” But in reality, WHY DID I DO THAT?! I KNOW BETTER. -.-  I guess on the bright side, I did hand hygiene and wore gloves lol … i guess. *facepalm* why…

I knew the end product was the patient had a Pulmonary Embolism because it said on the schedule but the point of this simulation was to get from point A to the end product. It’s like this large puzzle and you have to somehow put together their symptoms (the puzzle pieces) and then notify the doctor and try to relieve the problem. This is exactly what nurses do in real life! So when I failed, I felt really bad about it and guilty. Like why couldn’t I do it? and WHY DID I GIVE MORPHINE WITHOUT CHECKING FOR ORDERS?! GOODNESS. *more facepalm*

I think the hardest part was hearing all the “you should have, could have” done _____ from my peers. It is a learning experience but honestly, all i wanted to say to them was, “you don’t know what it was like until you’re in there”. I’ve definitely been in the viewing room and in my head I’m shouting like omg you should be doing this why are you doing that? like its a TV show but when you’re in there, it’s completely different. I was low key crying during the whole debrief because 1) I’m emotional 2) I was beating myself up for the dumb things I did in there. I know better and I know I could have done better but it is what it is and on the bright side, it’s a mannequin and he’s fine…I think…

What I would do differently is call the provider as soon as his vital signs started to deteriorate. The sooner I get the doctor’s orders, the sooner I can implement them and help the patient relieve the symptoms and prevent his condition from worsening.

I can literally write a book called “things you shouldn’t do as a nurse” based on my actions in the SIM lab that haha it was horrible. But again, I learned from my lesson and I hope my peers did too lol “this is what you shouldn’t do in a situation like this” 🙂 AND thank goodness they didn’t make me watch myself fail. That would have been even more traumatizing LOL I laugh about it now but man, during and after the simulation lab, I was a mess. sigh…

Anyways, that’s pretty much it for this blog post. If you guys have any stories from nursing school or even as a real nurse, comment them down below and we can laugh or cry about it together!

Thank you for stopping by and hanging out with me! If you liked this blog post, give it a biggggg thumbs up! And subscribe to my blog for future notifications of when I post! Also check out my youtube channel where I upload my vlogs!

Signing off from this blog post… I hope you have a beautiful day and don’t forget to shine bright, you’re beautiful. Thanks for reading!

 

Peace out.✌

❤ , TIFF

Real Nurse (R.N.) in the making.

 

psst… check out my last post here!

psst… I’m exhausted.

WHY I CHOSE NURSING AS A CAREER // LETIFFANYSHOW✨

hello there

Welcome back to my blog!

nursnig school

Today’s post is more of a personal one. I guess it’s more of a pre-nursing school reflection. It’ll be fun to look back and reminisce why I chose nursing as a career. So let’s back it up a bit..back to December 2016. That was the date I graduated from college with a bachelor degree in Human Biology. It seemed like everyone around me knew what they wanted to do and were on their way to get there but for me, I was completely lost.

I actually graduated college wanting to go into Public Health. It seemed like the job I wanted to do because ultimately, I wanted to make a difference in the world. But to be completely honest, what I saw of public health was based on two courses in college and after being rejected from an volunteer position from LA County , I realized that maybe public health wasn’t what I thought it was. So, it was back to the drawing board. Back to the healthcare setting that I knew and loved.

After being rejected from the public health volunteer position, I felt really down and confused. I think I was at the mall with my mom when I almost bursted into tears because I felt like a failure. I couldn’t figure out what to do with my life. I knew it had to be something that I’d want to do for the rest of my life because my worst fear is wasting time and money. My mom, being a nurse for over 40 years, was like, “What about nursing?” then she started telling me about all this nursing information and all the different paths you could take with nursing.

I was sold.

I realized that I really loved patient interaction. During my job at the clinic, I got to have a lot of patient interaction. Instead of being in a cubicle, I wanted to be up on my feet and to be able to work with patients to make a positive impact on their lives. Of course, there’s always going to be those unhappy, mean, and rude patients but the nice and appreciative ones always override them.

There is such versatility in the nursing world. There are different work environments a nurse can work in such as, hospitals, nursing homes, adult health care centers, and schools. Nurses are also constantly learning new things throughout their career as new advances and treatments are discovered, which has always been a passion of mine. Being able to educate people on how to improve their quality of life will be a staple of mine and leaving an positive impact on others.

All in all, I hope picked the right path and nursing is something I fell in love with. Program starts at the beginning of October and I’m scared af. But from all the good things I’ve heard, I hope it’ll be a rewarding experience.

Now that I’m walking on my own path, I want to end this blog post with this: Don’t worry too much if your original plans don’t work out. It may seem like the end of the world at that time but look around you. You’ll be inspired with all the things in the world and soon you’ll be on your way. It’s a good feeling, trust me.

As always, thank you so so much for stopping by! I hope you enjoyed this long ass rant of mine. Stay inspired and keep learning. Stay tuned for more nursing school rants and vlogs! I hope you have a beautiful day and don’t forget to shine bright, you’re beautiful ❤

Shine bright, peace out.✌

 

❤ , TIFF

Real Nurse (R.N) in the making.

 

psst… check out my last post here!

Credit// Clip art from here

 


Where to find meh  :

Pinterest:@letiffanyshow

Tumblr: http://teafaakneeshow.tumblr.com

Twitter: @letifffanyshow

Youtube: @letiffanyshow